Add to favorite
 
Subscribe to our Newsletters Subscribe to our Newsletters Get Daily Updates RSS


Postmodernism in Modern Russian Literature
July 23, 2015 21:55


Postmodernism appeared in the late 20th century and combined philosophical and cultural trends of the time. There was integration of science, art, religion, and philosophy. Not looking for profound mysteries and issues of life, Postmodernism tends to simplicity and superficial reflection of the world. Therefore, Postmodernism  literature is aimed at accepting the world as it is rather than understanding and explaining.
Postmodernism in Russia
Modernism and Avant-gardism, which sought to revive traditions of the Silver Age were forerunners of Postmodernism. Russian Postmodernism in literature declined mythologization of reality, which was characteristic of the earlier literary trends. At the same time, it created its own mythology, finding it the most comprehensible cultural language. Postmodernists writers are engaged in a dialogue with the chaos, which they see as a real model of life. The look for compromise between chaos and order.
Russian Postmodernist Writers
The ideas considered by many Russian Postmodernist writers in their works happen to be strange unstable hybrids of absolutely incompatible concepts. Thus, books by Victor Erofeyev, Andrey Bitov and S. Sokolov present paradoxical compromises between life and death. In writings by Tatyana Tolstaya and Victor Pelevin these are compromises between the imagination and reality, whereas for Victor Erofeyev and Vyacheslav Pyetsukh these are compromises between the rules and absurdity.
Postmodernism in Russian literature consists in combination of opposite concepts: the sublime and the low, pathetics and mockery, the fragments and integrity. Thus, oxymoron becomes its basic principle.
Besides the above mentioned writers, the Russian postmodernists are Sergey Dovlatov, Vladimir Voynovich, Lyudmila Petrushevskaya, Vasily Aksyonov, and Andrey Sinyavsky. The main characteristic features of Postmodernism in their works , include seeing art as the way of  organizing the text according to specific rules, trying to convey their world outlook through organized chaos in book pages, inclination to parody and denial of authorities, and combining various  literary eras and genres in one text. The ideas proclaimed by Postmodernism in literature, indicate its continuity with Modernism, which called for leaving the civilization and returning to the wildness, thus leading to the highest point of involution – the chaos.
Having taken shape in Russia in the 1980s-90s, Postmodernism in literature incorporated the crash of ideals and aspiration to escape from orderliness. Hence is mosaicity and fragmentariness of consciousness so typical of Postmodernist writings. Every author refracted it in one's own way. Lyudmila Petrushevskaya and Vladimir Orlov combined thirst for naturalistic nakedness in the description of reality and aspiration to break through it into the mystical realms. The world was felt as chaotic in the Post-Soviet era. A postmodernist plot often hinges on the act of creativity, with the writer being the main character .
Russian Postmodernism is non-uniform. It is represented by two trends: Conceptualism and Sots Art.
Conceptualism is based on dethronement and criticism of any ideological theories, ideas and beliefs. The most vivid representatives of Conceptualism in modern Russian literature are the poets Lev Rubenstein, Dmitry Prigov, and Vsevolod Nekrasov.
Sots Art in the Russian literature can be understood as a version of Conceptualism, or Pop Art. All works of Sots Art are based on Socialist Realism: ideas, symbols, mentalities, and ideology of the Soviet era. Representatives of Sots Art are Z. Gareyev, A. Sergeyev, A. Platonova, Victor Sorokin, A. Sergeyev, and others.


Sources: http://fb.ru 

Author: Vera Ivanova

Tags: Postmodernism Russian Literature Russian Writers   

Next Previous

You might also find interesting:

Kir Bulychev : Tale-Teller and Scientist The Baggage of Writer Andrei Bitov Russian Writers on the World Book Market, Part 1 Boris Akunin: the Evil Spirit or Good Luck of Modern Russian Fiction? Stalkers of Russian Science Fiction the Strugatsky Brothers





comments powered by Disqus




Comment on our site


RSS   twitter   facebook   submit

Bookmark and Share

Russian Parliament in Action

search on the map
TAGS:
Russian Cinema  Avant-garde  Barysh  Moon   Russian Literature  Russian restaurants   Gelendzhik  franchising  Magnitsky Act  Moscow Region  Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Russia  Alexander Deyneka  Archeology  Exhibitions in Moscow  Stepan Pisakhov  Football championship 2018  Russian companies  Architecture  Bolshoi Theatre  Republic of Buryatia  South Stream  Russian politics  nuclear physics  Political Rallies  Varvara Bubnova  Joseph Stalin  International Book Fair  Exhibitions in Moscow  VTB Capital  Russian Astronauts  snow leopard  Republic of Korea  Mikhail Khodorkovsky  Russian history  astronomy  Erarta Museum of Modern Art  Estate Jazz Festival  Russian language  Russian business  Voronezh   Republic of Ingushetia  sanctions  Exhibitions in Saint Petersburg  Movie Theatres  Arctic  economic crisis  Sport-Express  Painting  Russian tourism  Moscow 


Travel Blogs
Top Traveling Sites