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Cult wooden sculpture is a vivid phenomenon in Russian art. On a par with icons and works of decorative and applied arts it was part of artistic ensembles of ancient churches and chapels. The earliest monuments that have come down to us are dated to the 14th-15th centuries.


Krestetsky stitching(or Krestets embroidery aka Krestsy whitework) is an old Russian folk handicraft that developed in Krestetsky District from the 1860s. Krestetsky stitching is a unique kind of national cutwork-type embroidery.


Shemogodsky carving is the traditional Russian folk art and craft of birchbark carving that became popular due to masters of Shemogodsky Volost of Veliky Ustyug District.


Velikiy Ustyug Silver Patination is the national Russian art and craft that developed in the 17th century in Velikiy Ustyug, nowadays a district centre in the Vologda Region. It is decoration with patina designs of various silver items, such as, for example, cigar cases, glass holders, and tableware sets.


Russian ornamentation is justly considered one of the most interesting phenomena of the world art culture. It represents a unique realm of artistic images. Throughout centuries the Russian ornament was changing and transforming, but unalterably excited imagination of contemporaries with its inherent poetry and beauty of lines and colours.


Birchbark manuscripts represent one of the most enigmatic phenomena of Russian history. Proved to be amazingly long-lasting, they open up unlimited possibilities for learning about the past in historical areas where quests for new sources were recognized hopeless.


Birchbark wickerwork is an old Russian handicraft. At all times amazing natural qualities of beautiful birchbark were considered irreplaceable in household. The famous Russian lapti (aka bast shoes) are among the numerous articles handmade of birchbark.


Russian Folk Arts and Crafts, embodying original artistic traditions of multi-national Russia and centuries-long experience of aesthetic perception, undoubtedly make an integral part of world culture. Today there is a growing interest in revived craftsmanship traditions both in Russia and abroad.


Among the centres of folk handicraft of pottery, unique is the phenomenon of decorative ceramics of Skopin town of the Ryazan Region. The craft owes its appearance to clays lying in great quantities in the environs of the town of Skopin. Ceramic dishware in the area, where Skopin was founded later, had been made as far back as in the Kievan Rus epoch. Ryzan lands rich in traditions of various folk arts and crafts became the cradle of pottery ware and modeled clay whistles.


Dyatkovo crystal-glass ware production has existed for over 200 years and has a rich history. The artistic and material qualities of Dyatkovo crystal-glass make it a true pearl of Russian artistic glasswork.


The tradition to decorated ones house with wood carving is rooted in pagan times, when every sign left with a mans hand be it a notch or a dent had some magic power and had great sense and meaning in struggle with the powers of nature.


The preserved monuments of Russian wooden architecture provide evidence of high building craftsmanship, artistic skills and subtle taste of folk artisans. Masterpieces of old Russian architecture win admiration with simplicity and nobility of shapes, original solving of building challenges, and richness of interior trim.


Kasli, one of the oldest towns of the South Ural, is famous world over thanks to its iron cast sculptures and works of applied art. Ural casting is the leader of artistic and architectural casting of iron and bronze of the 18-20th centuries, known among both art collectors and general public.


Kukarka Lace (aka Vyatka Lace or Kirov Lace) is a type of traditional handmade bobbin weaving and one of the well-known folk Russian arts and crafts. The centre of Kukarka lace handicraft is the town of Sovetsk (formerly Kukarka Village of the Vyatka Province) in the Kirov Region. In its artistic significance, valuable folk traditions and creative finds of the recent times the handicraft is on a par with other lace-making centers.


Yelets Lace is a famous Russian handicraft of bobbin lace woven from bobbin threads of brown, white, yellowish, black or grey colours. The centre of the handicraft is Yelets town of the Lipetsk Region. Lace-making sprang there in the late 18th century, and in the 19th century already Yelets gained the lead in lace producing in Russia. Yelets craftswomen wove measured lace, kerchiefs and collars.


Print Shawls produced in Pavlovski-Posad town are a unique phenomenon of Russian culture and are often perceived as one of the national symbols of Russia. Both Russians and foreigners have always highly estimated traditional Pavlovo-Posadski print shawls. They appeal with the multicolored palette, finest elaboration of floral ornaments, thorough drawing of every flower, among which the rose is a favourite and a sort of a symbol of the Pavlovo-Posadski kerchiefs.


These beautiful and cozy, light and warm hand-knitted shawls of fine down are among the popular symbols of Russia. The downy wool of Orenburg goats is the finest in the world: it is only 16-18 micrometers, while angora goats wool (mohair) is 22 to 24 micrometers thick. This is why Orenburg downy knitted items shawls and gossamers - are especially gentle and soft.


No other centre of lace manufacturing in Russia enjoyed such fame as the city of Vologda and its modest dwellers Sophia Davydova wrote in her well-known research book Russian Lace and Russian Lace-makers.


Since long ago dwellers of the Russian North procured seal bones and walrus tusks in the polar seas and gathered fossil mammoth bones on the shores of the Arctic Ocean. The bone carvings from Kholmogory were notable for excellent craftsmanship and perfected technique. The best carving masters from Kholmogory were invited to work in the Kremlin's Armoury, which performed orders for the tsars court.


Few Russian gems are considered to be undoubtedly better than their foreign analogues. Few gems have their own patron. It is widely known that the best malachite was produced in the Urals.


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