Add to favorite
 

russian visa
    Komi Republic

The Komi Republic has a number of attractions that make this legendary land so charming and peaceful. The northern territories of Russia teem with marvelous landscapes, endless spaces, thick woods, crystal lakes everything that is of such great value in the century of high technologies and urban style of life.

If you want to find yourself in the land that remained untouched, where everything stayed as it was centuries ago, if you want to feel the eternity and take a rest from everyday troubles, then the Komi Republic is exactly what you need. The National Park Yugud-Va may offer you an exciting adventure back to the times when man was an integral part of the surrounding nature.

In case you happen to visit this wonderful land, dont miss a small village of Ust-Vym and its architectural and historical heritage.

Population and language

Over one million people live in the Komi Republic representing more than 70 different ethnic groups. Russians comprise the largest population group (58%) followed by the indigenous Komi peoples (23%). Other groups - Ukrainians (8%), Belorussians (2%), and Tatars (2%) also live on the territory of the Komi Republic.

There are two official languages in the Republic - Komi, which belongs to the Finno-Ugric group of languages, and Russian. 74,3% of the Komi people speak their mother tongue.

Komi people

The Komi people (they used to call themselves as zyryane) live in the northeastern region of the European part of Russia, mainly in the Komi Republic. Actually, there are several groups of the Komi people who also live on the Komi-Permic Autonomous Area, Western Siberia and Kola Peninsula.

There about 1 million representatives of this ancient culture living in Russia, 80% of which still stick to their native language and ancient traditions.

According to linguistic analysis, the history of this people starts in the 7th century AD the ancestors of the Komi people. Their ancestors were of the Finno-Ugric origin. When this huge community disintegrated some centuries BC, new cultures were formed that may be ancestors of the Komi people.

In the 14th century AD the Komi territories were incorporated into the Russian State and since then this land started to develop rapidly, particularly after the conversion into the Russian Orthodox Church.

The Komi people were generally engaged in cattle breeding, hunting, and woodworking. As the region was extremely rich with forests, its almost impossible to name all the items that were made from wood.

Due to numerous lakes and rivers, waterways were the main means of transportation and communication. The Komi people used generally boats as the main means of transportation. The Komi peoples were also engaged in wood and birch working, painting, embroidery, clothe printing, fir, clay and metal working, etc.

Traditional womans costume of the Komi people consisted of a shirt and a sarafan (a long dress). In winter they usually wore leather boots or valenki and sheepskin coats.

Tags: Russian tourism Russian regions Komi Republic Russian history  


Region:


City:


comments powered by Disqus




Comment on our site


RSS   twitter   facebook   submit

Bookmark and Share

Flowers Delivery

search on the map

    Komi Republic

Cities of the region

 Syktyvkar
 Vorkuta
 Ukhta
 Inta
 Usinsk
Geography
Getting around

TAGS:
Nikolay Ozerov  Russian Nature  Russian churches  Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Russia  Russian weather  Russian journalists  Siberia  BRICS   London  parking fees  Tver  Silver Ice  Russian spacecrafts  Opposition  Arkhangelsk Oblast  Avant-garde  Siberian cultural tourism forum  Fashion  AK-102  physics  Proekt Fabrika  Caspian Fashion Week  Tele2 AB  Russian shops  luxury travel in Russia  Russian Cinema  Russian Literature  St. Petersburg  Russian political parties  Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week   Russian business  Russian Museums   Vladislav Galkin  Rachel Lee Hovnanian  Moscow  Modest Mussorgsky  Maria Galina  Chudskoe Lake  Russian history  Vyacheslav Malafeev  Archaeology  Life Saving  Exhibitions in Moscow  Alexander Sokurov  Censorship  Archeology  Russian tourism  Photo Exhibitions  Russian monarchs  Painting 


Travel Blogs
Top Traveling Sites