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Tags: Old Russian Beliefs


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Russian Birds of Paradise
Sirin, Alkonost, and Gamayun are enigmatic fairy bird-maidens from old Russian legends and mythic tales. Who are they, these mysterious bird-maidens from Paradise or, in another way, the Solar Garden? How did they appear in Russian culture?
--01-09-2011--
New Year Traditions and Beliefs in Russia
January the first winter month was once called prosinets (azure-like) in Old Rus, because after the low gloomy sky of December it brought islets of clear dark blue sky. But January was also famous for its blizzards and frosts. Hence is its ancient name of sechen (whipping one). Besides, January also used to be the month of Vasily (Basil) in honor of St. Basil, whose day fell on January, 1st the turning point of winter.
--25-10-2011--
Traditional Russian Wedding Feast
Weddings in Russia were traditionally celebrated in a vivacious and noisy way, with observation of numerous customs, signs, and popular beliefs. The festivities usually lasted for three days, but sometimes could extend to a whole week. Russian wedding ceremony was certainly accompanied with an abundant and plentiful feast, representing ceremonial dishes of Russian cuisine.
--28-08-2011--
Ivan Kupala Day: Looking for Fern Flower
Day of Ivan Kupala (aka John the Baptist, or Ivan the Herbalist) in the olden days was one of the most sacred, important and the most rackety festivities for the Russian people. All partook in the celebrations: they would gather herbs and flowers, twine wreaths, make bonfires, jump over them and play, bathe in rivers and lakes and perform divinations about ones intended.
--25-10-2011--
Bright Holiday of Pascha, or Russian Easter
The festival of all festivals this is how Pascha was called in pre-revolutionary Russia. In those days it was a custom to make merry at fairs, entertain on see-saws and merry-go-rounds, pay visits, and give and take presents. Yet, the greatest pleasure after many days of Lent was certainly the Easter feast.
--28-08-2011--
Maslenitsa, the Holiday of Spring and Sun
The tradition of Maslenitsa takes its roots in pagan times, when the Russian folks would bid farewell to stark winter and welcome long-awaited spring with mouth-watering pancakes, as round, yellow and hot, as the Sun itself, as well as with games, songs, dances and burning down the Winter effigy.
--28-08-2011--
Russian Wedding Beliefs and Superstitions
Marriage being sort of a turning point in life, wedding ceremony and everything related to it has always been accompanied with variety of traditions and beliefs, some rooted in hoary antiquity, some recently devised, but all targeted at bringing good luck to the newlyweds and averting misfortune from them.
--28-08-2011--





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